#mynextrightthing

I adore Emily P Freeman and her work. I was honored to be a part of her launch team and have been slowly absorbing the book in small chunks. It makes me think.

On Instagram Emily offers a community encouragement project to lead people through the book. I am not participating on Insta, but will share the graphic and some of my thoughts here.

pay attention

I pay attention to other people’s reactions and then sometimes base my behavior off this information. It has made me successful in job interviews in the past. I pay attention if I care about you or the outcome.

I pay attention to small details for my writing. I pay attention to how I feel or how something looks so I can write about it later. I pay attention to my reactions to words – written and oral – and then reflect on them later in writing.

I am not consistent about paying attention to the clothes I wear. I used to care a great deal and would be in dresses and heels 95% of the time. My job is different here, but sometimes I feel like my choices of clothing is based only that I need to be covered so I am not arrested for indecent exposure.

find silence

There is no real silence.

There are pockets of time where there is LESS noise.

There are always thoughts circulating through my brain. There is always a fan on, or a machine whirring, or a phone ringing.

When the power goes out and everything stops there is MORE silence.

name it

The idea of naming is a concept that seems particular to Emily. On Tsh’s podcast SIMPLE last year it was mentioned that Emily has the knack for naming the un-nameable. This has stuck with me and intrigues me.

Is it real unless you name it? Does IT have to have a label? Like relationships – people ask each other “What are we?” “Where is this going?” “Are you my girl/boy friend?”

In writing – did it really happen if it doesn’t end up on paper? Or on a social media platform?

We all have stories and the way we tell them are our own.

Naming is not explaining. I do think of naming as reframing. The darkness has the ability to suck us into the place where we know no answers. It can cause worry, anxiety, and physical ailments.

When I am upset that a car has cut me off on the highway instead of being sucked into negativity I think “Maybe they have a sick child and are needing to get home.”

When someone gives me a reaction that I am not expecting I think “Maybe they have something else on their mind right now.”


Emily says naming can release new growth and requires specificity. But naming is something I am still figuring out. Any thoughts are appreciated!

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7 thoughts on “#mynextrightthing

  1. The attention to detail here is really interesting. The part about naming things is especially thought provoking. I think like that a lot when I make a new recipe, if it doesn’t match up to my idea of something in my head I’m not even sure if I can post it if it doesn’t have a label x

    Sophie

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Pay attention! Hopefully we as teachers are pretty good at this, but you bring us to a whole new level with this post. I love this! Naming it? This is really interesting as well. Sometimes that is so hard to do – especially with emotions! You have thrown down a gauntlet here and its an enticing one. Thank you!

    Liked by 1 person

  3. It looks like she is trying to help people become more aware of their surroundings and to take control of their emotions in a positive way.

    Most of us are not aware of our surroundings or the people that pass by. Everything is a non-living object, it seems. I get a sense she is trying to bring out the life in us and push away the routine that most of us fall in to.

    This was interesting. I will have to check this out.

    Liked by 1 person

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